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Testicular Cancer Screening

Overview

Testicular cancer is not common. It is often first discovered by the person or a sex partner as a lump or an enlarged and swollen testicle. In the early stages of testicular cancer, the lump, which may be about the size of a pea, usually is not painful. Testicular cancer has a high cure rate.

Experts don't recommend screening for testicular cancer. For example, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises against routine testicular exam or testicular self-exams in teens and adults who have no symptoms.footnote 1 The USPSTF says that the evidence shows that these exams have only a small benefit (if any) and may cause harm from false-positive results that lead to having diagnostic tests or procedures you don't need.

Monthly testicular self-exams may be recommended for those who are at high risk for testicular cancer. This includes anyone who has a history of an undescended testicle or a family or personal history of testicular cancer.

References

Citations

  1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2011). Screening for testicular cancer: Reaffirmation recommendation statement. Available online: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf10/testicular/testicuprs.htm.

Credits

Current as of: May 4, 2022

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Christopher G. Wood MD, FACS - Urology, Oncology

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